WE’RE CONNECTED TO OUR LOVED ONES

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This is the face of a young woman who is taking her last round of Chemotherapy, yesterday, Tuesday, January 24, 2017. I am grateful to God for all of His mercy. 

Guess what? I didn’t realize until yesterday how much my daughter’s illness had taken a toll on me, too. But when I knew that she wouldn’t have to be extremely sick for days on end; when I realized that she wouldn’t blow up any more (she got bigger from the 3 different chemo medicines they were giving her), when I knew that I wouldn’t have to hold back my own emotions when she would say to me, “Mom, I’m just sick, so sick,” after she took those treatments; when I saw that she smiled genuinely in this photo; when she called me and said, “Mom, in two weeks we are all going to Red Lobster, and I am going to eat and enjoy it,” (she didn’t enjoy eating for months because she said that all she could taste was the medicines they gave her). When I could see that she wouldn’t spend hours just lying in the bed trying to rest from those treatments; when I knew that eventually her hair would grow back; when I knew that my youngest daughter had changed tremendously during this ordeal and that she’d never be the same; she had grown up that much more; when I knew that she was planning for the future when she said to me, “Mom, I want to move to another state…” When I weighed all of these items, I realized that I was weak with relief. I really couldn’t do much yesterday except thank God. 

Friends, we’re connected to those we love and what happens to them affects us. You may say, “I know that.” But when you have to stand by and helplessly watch as the one you love suffers, whatever the issue, be it physically, mentally, emotionally, financially, or spiritually; you’ll see even more clearly that you suffer along with them. 

For the first time in months I am focusing on myself. But if I am to be honest, I still have one eye on her. She will still have rounds of tests to do and blood to be drawn from time to time, but on a whole I have to say WE have come a long, long way.  

 

Rosa

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AND NOW…A WORD FROM OUR SPONSOR

If you grew up watching T.V. when I was young, there was alway a commercial or it was called a station break or even a word from our sponsor. I like that last phrase: Here’s a word from our sponsor.

I’ve enjoyed sharing my family’s history with you. You’ve all been sharing with me, too. I love it. But since I’ve shared with you almost daily something about family, I have had to take a station break. I want to give a word from the sponsor (me).

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I don’t know where you are in your relationships with family and close friends, but if it is a broken or even shattered relationship, try to mend it. Circumstances can change so drastically and so suddenly and you don’t want anything to get in between you and your loved one will may come to need you.

I have three daughters and one son and for so long they have made me proud. The illnesses we’ve all endured to this point have been ‘fixable’ and not too severe, but now my youngest daughter was diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer. I just couldn’t wrap my head around it for about 3 days. But since that time she’s gone through surgery, and will soon take Chemotherapy. My heart is broken for her and my husband and I are with her. She is the quietest of all the children, and she has a strength that the others don’t necessarily have. She will never have children, which in and of itself doesn’t bother me—she said more than once as a teen that she never wanted children. She is content to be an aunt. It’s at times like these that I find the faith that I’ve let you hear in my posts from time to time is strong. I have no doubt that God has picked her out for this particular test—and me, too. I’m a mom and feel as a mom would feel to hear her child is ill like that. But my faith in Jesus the Christ is solid and He’s brought us through other trials. He won’t fail now. ovarian-cancer-awareness-fbcover

Keep her in your thoughts and prayers.

Rosa

 

MEET MY FAMILY – MATRIARCH – GRANDMOTHER LUCY ANN PAYNE

Grandmother on her way to church.
Grandmother on her way to church.
Grandmother Lucy Payne
Hiding from the camera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is my dad’s mother, Lucy Ann Payne. One of my sisters is named after her. In the picture with her standing on her way to church, you can see Aunt Lucy Mae in the background. In the picture where she is hiding her face from the camera, that little boy is my older brother. (You’ll meet him, too). So this picture was from about 1950 or 1951.

If Aunt Lucy Mae was born in 1926 or 1927, my grandmother was born approximately 1897. Her husband’s name was Will Payne. I never saw even a picture of my grandfather. And oddly, I never met my grandmother in person before she died in 1963. I only have these pictures of her and what we learned that was passed down by word of mouth. A great woman, she was.

Go with me:

  • Her husband died in his early 40s.
  • She bore and raised at least 11 children
  • She buried many of her children
  • She was beaten by white men more than once
  • She was driven from her farm and land
  • She had to settle somewhere else in Florida so that she and her two children could live
  • She had memories of her dead sons hanging from the end of nooses
  • She never saw all of her grandchildren, just a few of them
  • She smiled in the picture above, anyway

A woman of strength is a formidable person to reckon with.

Also, the Scriptures say in Proverbs 31:30 “Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised.”

I honor you today Grandmother. More tomorrow

Rosa

JONATHAN’S WAY CHAPTER 13

JONATHAN’S HEIGHT AND SIZE

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I don’t know when I really began to notice that he was growing up very fast. But he did grow fast, to me. So, I expressed it to his pediatrician at the time. “Doctor, he is very tall for his age,” I said.  The doctor looked up from his notes at Jonathan’s year physical and replied, “And…”

 

I felt silly. He told me that there was nothing I could do about what inherited or genetic. If he’s tall, he’s tall. Well, that was when he was about 6 years old. In these pictures, he’ll 11 years old.  He had the distinction of being the tallest boy in his school. Why, when a real bona fide lumberjack came to the 4th grade classes and took pictures with them, my Jonathan was taller than the lumberjack!

I read an online article regarding children on the spectrum growing taller and weighing more than other children without their challenges:

"Preliminary analysis shows that younger children with ASDs tend to be taller, and older children with ASD tend to be heavier, than their unaffected siblings."    

https://iancommunity.org/cs/ian_research_reports/weight_and_height_minireport.  -Online Reference

There is always something to smile about where Jonathan is concerned:

  • My husband and I along with Jonathan were at the voting booth one year, and a volunteer, noticing his height, spoke to him and asked how old he was. Jonathan said he was 8 years old. The volunteer, an older gentlemen, looked at me and said, “It just means he’s healthy.”
  • He was sparing with his Sensei when he was about 8 years old. He got a good punch in and he actually staggered his Sensei. After class he told my husband and me that if Jonathan ever really comes to life about Karate, he’s gonna be formidable.

For the time being, I will enjoy my big boy and continue to teach him so that he will be able to survive in this world. He is not aggressive, nor is he timid. He is Jonathan and as he begins to process his surroundings I anticipate and expect for him to master his environment with courage and strength.

More tomorrow.

Rosa

JONATHAN’S WAY CHAPTER 11

I’M NOT A TIMID PERSON NOR AM I A TIMID MOM

Lest while reading this series you may think that I am a soft and timid person, I want to dispel that notion right now. My husband and I raised six children and had three others in our home that we kept for a considerable amount of time, influencing them for their full potential. We also had two dogs.

When I say that I cried a lot, I did. But after wiping my tears I continued to work and nurture Jonathan so that he can survive in a world that really doesn’t love children and would rather them be a statistic for a report than a person of strength and an asset to their community and society. I am not intimidated by the world’s skewered idea of parenting. Case and point:

I was on my way down to wash clothes. I had two laundry baskets full of dirty clothes, plus the detergent and softener, and a change purse full of quarters. Jonathan was about 5 years old, I think. I said, Jonathan get that laundry basket and take it downstairs. His reply was, “Mom, it’s too heavvvvv” (heavy). I repeated, “I said pick up that laundry basket and take it downstairs.” He said, “It’s too heavvvvv.”  Now for the record, it was ‘heavvv’, but my Jonathan is unusually strong, and he was big for his age. He is also a member of our family and in our home we always taught that everyone work together so that one person wouldn’t have to do everything. That kind of systems breeds anger, resentment, and strife.

Well, Mr. It’s too heavvv found out that Mom wasn’t concerned about it being heavvv. I reached for my little wooden backscratcher, and before I could even get it in  my hand, he had the very heavvv basket, opened the apartment door and was down the stairs before I could even pick  up my own load of clothes. I laughed a lot while I stumbled down the stairs. 

dirty laundry in a basket, white background

The moral of the story: I refuse to let my grandson be a liability, even with all of his challenges. I raise him as if he has no additional challenges other than what is common to all children growing up. I know he has them, but I don’t brandish them to him or anyone else. I also refuse to handicap or disable him. More tomorrow.

I’ve told all my children this: Your shoulders have to be big enough for someone else to lean on.

Rosa