HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME!

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http://www.moviepostershop.com/the-man-from-the-alamo-movie-poster-1953

I was born at 1:30 a.m. in the morning, 63 years ago. My mother is on the phone right now relaying how I was born. She had gone to the movies late night ( she saw “The Man From the Alamo with Glen Ford) and was on her way back to her house (1-1/2 blocks away from the movies). As she was walking, a dog came out and scared her. She picked up a brick and threw it at the dog and it ran away from her. It was then that her water broke. She said she was afraid to be alone, and asked another lady who was out that time of night (it was much safer then) if she would stay with her because her water broke. When the lady heard that my mom’s water had broken, SHE RAN! So, Mom made her way home, and her brother-in-law took her to the house, she woke my dad up and when they got to the hospital and an hour later at 1:30 a.m. on a Tuesday morning, I was born.

  • The name of the theater she went to was called the Castle Theater 3412 Hastings Street, Detroit, MI 48211.
  • The Castle Theatre opened in 1914. It seated 1,350. The theatre closed in the early-1960’s. The site is now an empty lot. 

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Guess what, it cost her $.35 to see two movies and all the previews in 1953. She said that you’d see a cartoon and the news reels back then, all for $.35. Also, if women came on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, they would receive bowls or plates. A box of popcorn cost $.07, a hot dog was  $.10, and candy bars cost $.05. She said that if you wanted a larger candy the size of a rolling-pin it would cost you $.25. That was good marketing at that time. Can you see how full those theaters were in the 1950s? We can’t market that good now! We used to dwell in a Live and Let Live world. Not anymore. 

There’s nothing like family history. Keep it and never let it go.

Rosa 

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MEET MY FAMILY – SIBLINGS – OLDEST BROTHER ROY

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This is a picture of my brother Roy. Here he is a Marine. Gunnery Sergeant Roy L. Payne, Jr. My brother was in the Marines from the age of 19 years to 30  years. He had initially planned to make a career of it. He was a Judo expert while in the Marines. My dad was a Marine, and so it followed suit that my brother went into the military as a Marine. He married a woman and had two children. But before that he held a distinguished position in 1969 before enlisting in the Marines and before management positions were really available to minorities. He was a manager at what used to be called Ma Bell – Bell Telephone Company, at the ripe old age of 20 years old. He had gotten his electronics certificate after graduating from High School, from RETS Electronics School. He was expert at that, as well.

When he enlisted in the Marines, he was stationed in Japan for about 3  years. He settled in 29 Palm, CA when he married in 1972. He and my sister-in-law had two children, Ruth, and Roy III. My brother grew and learned a lot before he turned 30 years old. A Christian man, he raised his family with delight. Ruth was 6 and Roy III was about 2 years old. 

November 16, 1980 at about 1:45 a.m. early morning, my two brothers-in-law rang my doorbell and told me that my Mom would need  me. I knew something had happened, but for the life of me I couldn’t have believed that when I got to my Mom and Dad’s house that I would hear that Roy had been killed in a car accident in California, that day. That was devastating enough, but he was killed by a drunk driver, and the drunk driver was a Marine also. WOW! My parents flew to California for the services. The rest of us had a memorial for him, where we lived. You know for so long I was angry with that drunk driver and wanted to hurt him, but he was killed, too. There was nothing but anger and pain as I thought of my sister-in-law and young niece and nephew who would only know their dad through pictures and word of mouth memories. He was married only 8 years and died at 30 years old. He would have been 67 this coming December. Ruth is 42 and Roy III is 37. My brother is missed, but never forgotten. 

DON’T DRINK AND DRIVE! THE EFFECTS LAST A LIFETIME.

MEET MY FAMILY – MOM’S SIDE – A MILESTONE NO ONE ELSE HAS MET!

It’s been a roller coaster of emotions with my daughter being sick with cancer, but it is a great relaxation to blog about someone in our family who reached a  milestone that no one else on Mom’s or Dad’s side of the family has ever met. My sister Brenda and her husband Ronald celebrated 50 years of marriage last year September 25, 2015. Their children surprised them with a 50th Wedding Anniversary banquet. It was just beautiful. And just this past Sunday they celebrated 51 years of marriage! Let’s all stand up and applaud. She was 19 years old and he was 24 when they married.  She just turned 70 and he’ll be 75 in December.

No one else in our entire family has ever reached that milestone, due to death of a spouse or divorce of a spouse. My grandparents, parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, in-laws, and siblings.  Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Ronald Evans have the distinction of being married 51 years this past Sunday, September 25, 2016. That record gives one hope in this non-committed society where anything like a shoe size is cause for divorce. It’s an honor to know anyone who has weathered the storm and came out wiser for it.

If you remember, my sister Brenda was named after one of my dad’s sisters, and she has the distinction of being the oldest of all the grandchildren on my Mom’s side, too.

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY RONALD AND BRENDA.

GOD GRANT YOU MORE YEARS TOGETHER!

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Cutting Anniversary cake

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Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert and Brenda Evans Golden Anniversary Banquet

 

 

MEET MY FAMILY – MOM’S SIDE – MY AUNT ELLA

 

 

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              Aunt Ella age 87

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Infant Aunt Ella in 1929 with her older brother

What can I say about my Aunt Ella? So much. She was always so animated to me. She was a person I looked forward to seeing. We all loved to go to her house and stay overnight. If we couldn’t stay overnight, we’d stay just for a visit. No matter, we love her to this moment. Now she was not without her own set of idiosyncrasies:

When a child is 5 or 6 years old and Aunt Ella comes over making you smile and laugh  you warm up to her. So, as a child you ask, “Aunt Ella, how old are you?” She would answer, “I’m 19.” Whenever she said that, we would believe her. We were 5 and 6 years old, so 19 seemed a BIG age. Plus, no one ever refuted her statement. But when you are about 10-12 years of age and ask Aunt Ella, how old she is and her rely is, “I’m 19,” you begin to wonder whether that statement is true or not. When you turn 18 or 19 and ask that same question of Aunt Ella and she replies, “I’m 19,” you know that for many years she had been pulling your leg.  Check this out:

  1. Whenever she came over she made all of us kids stand in line as she gave us all a big spoonful of COD LIVER OIL! Yuck.cod-liver-oil
  2. Whenever you stayed with her your breakfast was Ralston Purina Hot Wheat Cereal, there was never an exceptionoldbox-ralston
  3. She always made you work, but never called it work. She said, “take this into the basement, while you’re resting.”
  4. She always taught us to marry for money: “Looks can’t feed ya.”
  5. She called my daddy “Son.” All the time. He was her brother-in-law.
  6. She was color struck: “Only marry ‘white meat’.” One great niece did that. No one else.
  7. You have never been disciplined until she used a switch on your legs.
  8. She is royalty: She calls herself the Queen of Spain!
  9. After all these years, when asked how old she is, she says, “I’m almost 20.”

There’s no one like her. Love you Auntie. More tomorrow.

 

MEET MY FAMILY – MY MOM’S SIDE – MY GRANDMA

This is my grandmother, Jimmie Marie Thomas-Jordan, as a youth12662733_901220829997986_1556625937150571113_n

My grandmother was born in Birmingham, AL and she along with her parents moved to Detroit, MI in the early 1910s  She was 2 almost 3 years old when she became ill, and lost her hearing. I don’t know the illness that did it. I know that my great-grandmother called to my grandmother and my grandmother never answered or indicated that she heard her mom calling her. That’s when great-grandmother took her to the doctor and discovered she was deaf.

In the picture above she is attending Michigan School of the Deaf in Flint, MI. She is about 9 or 10 years old (about 1920 or 21) in this picture.

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This is a picture of the Michigan  School of the Deaf about the turn of the 20th century.

Reference:http://www.michiganschoolforthedeaf.org/content/school-history

Here is something quaint: When my mother was a little girl and attended school, the teachers thought that she was a deaf-mute because she never spoke. They finally realized that she could speak. It was the fact that her parents were deaf mutes and used sign language to communicate that she didn’t speak.

During that time, my mom said she was embarrassed that her parents couldn’t talk and she hid the fact that she knew sign language until my grandmother came up to her school and began talking on her hands to mom. After she left, the teacher, bless her heart, raved about the fact that my mom could communicate like that. From that time on my mother was never ashamed of sign language again.  More tomorrow.

Rosa

 

MEET MY FAMILY – MOM’S SIDE

You know what, I think that in this technological age, this hustle and bustle environment in which we live; along with this instant gratification genre we’re all susceptible to, it’s easy to lose out on things that are important and lasting. That’s why I am enjoying talking about my family’s history. With that being said, please meet my grandparents on my mom’s side of the family:

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Mr. James & Mrs. Jimmie Marie Shephard

My grandfather James Shephard was born in 1895. My grandmother was born in 1910. Granddaddy passed away in 1970, and Grandma passed away in 1997. They were married for 41 years. This is a really beautiful picture of them. My grandmother was so very lovely. Here is a fact I want to share about them:

My grandparents both were deaf mutes. In our family on my mom’s side, we have two traits: One is that we have twins that show up every other generation. I know because I gave birth to twins myself. And we have that deaf gene I guess you call it, that also shows up every other generation.  My grandfather was born deaf, and his brother right behind him was also born deaf. My grandmother at the age of 3 years old had an illness that left her deaf. They had 10 children and all of them were born hearing and speaking.

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Brenda the oldest 70 yrs old Zeeland the youngest about 27 yrs old Both deaf (Brenda in one year) Zeeland (completely deaf)

When my mom and aunts and uncles began having their own children, my oldest sister, Brenda, was born deaf in one ear. Now the interesting thing about that is she is the oldest of all of the grandchildren on my mom’s side of the family. The last grandchild to be born to my aunts and uncles, who would be the youngest of all the grandchildren was born totally deaf. Family history is a curiosity that begs to be gratified. More tomorrow.

MEET MY FAMILY – TRIVIA AND FACTS

Here are some things I know about my dad’s side of the family:

  • He had a brother named Steven, who was lynched as a teen. I don’t know why.
  • His brother, Uncle Jesse was also killed and lynched. His story can be Googled. Uncle Jesse was married and had one child, a girl.
  • Uncle Amos ran with his mom and sister to save their lives when people wanted to kill them for their land.
  • My dad was on the chain gang as a young teen.
  • Aunt Lucy Mae never had children of her own.
  • My dad had a sister named Brenda. (My oldest sister was named after her). I  never knew her or saw a picture of her. She worked as a maid doing day work. She was killed while working. Her employer, the husband got into an argument with his own wife and started shooting his wife. Bullets were flying and my Aunt Brenda was killed by a stray bullet.
  • My dad’s great-grandmother was a full-blooded Cherokee Native American.
  • Uncle  Jesse was a soldier in the Army
  • Uncle Amos was a sailor in the Navy
  • Daddy was a United States Marine
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1870 Census Taker

Here’s information we got from the 1935 Census Bureau about my dad’s side of the family: (1867 – 1945 Florida State Census)

  • Will Payne – Born in 1893 approximately (Grandfather)
  • Lucy Ann Payne – Born in 1897 (Grandmother)

Ages in 1935 Census

  1. Will Payne – 42
  2. Lucy Ann Payne – 38
  3. Amos Payne – 12
  4. Lucy Mae Payne – 8
  5. Charlie Payne – 14
  6. Jesse Payne – 16
  7. Ruby Thurston – 25
  8. Henry Hunter – 36

Both Grandfather and Grandmother were born to former slaves.

More tomorrow

Rosa